Branding aid projects and initiatives

For managing contractors, NGOs, multilaterals and other partners

March 2014

Background

Branding is a key mechanism for enhancing the visibility of the Australian Government's international development and aid initiatives. Correct branding maximises recognition of the development role played by the Australian Government, alongside our broader public diplomacy strategy.

As part of the integration of the aid program into the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT), the Australian Aid Identifier—used to brand and identify all Australian Government development activities overseas—has been updated.

All partners, including NGOs, multilaterals and managing contractors, should use the new Australian Aid Identifier to brand all aid and development activities delivered overseas with support from the Australian Government. Only the new version, available from http://dfat.gov.au/dept/logos/, should be used.

The DFAT crest should also be used on all Australian Government aid program funded publications and any formal or public communication materials and products, to replace the discontinued AusAID crest. The use of the DFAT crest identifies the Australian Government's involvement.

If you are unsure about any element of branding, or you require clarification of this guidance, please contact the newly established DFAT Publications and Branding Unit through public.diplomacy@dfat.gov.au.

Branding guidelines

The branding guidelines will be updated as required.  Until then, existing guidelines on branding for the aid program remain in force with the DFAT crest replacing the AusAID crest, and the revised Australian Aid Identifier replacing the old version, in all instances in the guidelines. 

Communications, promotional and marketing materials (overseas)

All communication, promotional and marketing materials overseas must feature the DFAT crest and the Australia Aid Identifier. This includes books, brochures, maps and folders, on the opening screens of electronic presentations, such as PowerPoints, DVDs and online video clips. They should be in a prominent position but, allowing for flexibility in design, does not have to be in the top left corner.

The logo of a partner government, implementing partner, managing contractor, NGO or multilateral may also appear alongside the DFAT crest and the Australian Aid Identifier.

DFAT crest

The DFAT crest is DFAT’s primary logo. It signifies DFAT’s status as an Australian Government Department and represents the organisation and its staff. The DFAT crest is to be used on materials directly related to the delivery of the Australian aid program. It must always be used on DFAT materials in Australia and can also be used with the Australian Aid Identifier overseas. It cannot be used for broader corporate materials or any other purpose by a partner organisation in any way as this can incorrectly imply that the organisation acts with the authority of the Australian Government.

The DFAT crest should be used on all publications, and any formal or public communication materials and products to replace the discontinued AusAID crest. Versions for different uses are available on the DFAT website at http://dfat.gov.au/dept/logos/.

The updated Australian Aid Identifier

The updated Australian Aid Identifier should be used to identify all Australian Government funded development programs or projects overseas, and material associated with the projects, including signage, food bags, water tanks and buildings.

Exemptions for not applying branding can be granted by the Public Diplomacy Branch at DFAT if there is compelling case or an identified security risk (for example, in Afghanistan).

Only the new version of the Australian Aid Identifier (in reverse, colour or black and white) should be used for new products.

Old version

old version of the Australian Aid logo with a cross through it

New and approved versions for use from 1 November 2013 (reverse, colour and black)

reverse (red with blue background) version of the Aid identifier colour version of the Aid identifier black version of the Aid identifier

Versions for different uses are available on the DFAT website at: http://dfat.gov.au/dept/logos/.

Correct use of the DFAT crest and Australian Aid Identifier

In Australia - on all material

Australian Government Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade logo, strip version

Or

Australian Government Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade logo, stacked strip version

No Australian Aid identifier


Overseas - Printed material (publications, invitations, flyers etc.)

Australian Government Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade logo, strip version

Or

Australian Government Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade logo, stacked strip version

Plus

reverse (red with blue background) version of the Aid identifier

Overseas – Program-related material (project signage)

Only:

reverse (red with blue background) version of the Aid identifier

Overseas – Implementing partner clothing and printed materials for aid and humanitarian activities

Only:

reverse (red with blue background) version of the Aid identifier

Updating existing resources

Existing materials featuring the previous version of the Australian Aid Identifier or the AusAID crest should be updated according to business needs and material life cycles

Partners are advised not to incur additional costs updating existing materials unless there is a business case to do so, for instance, the need to replace damaged project signage, a high-level ministerial visit or a specific request from Canberra through the Publications and Branding Unit.

The AusAID crest and the previous Australian Aid Identifier should be removed from signage progressively and sensibly without incurring costs unnecessarily, while still having regard for the need to ensure the public presentation of a single Australian Government presence.

Formal signage for completed projects, such as foundation stones or commemorative plaques, should not be altered.

Text-based acknowledgements

When preparing public communication material (including website content, media releases and talking points), it is important to make it clear when aid/development/humanitarian assistance is provided by the Australian Government, whether solely or with other donors/partners.

Particular care should be taken in using the phrase “Australian aid” or “the Australian aid program” as the aid program is now part of DFAT and is not a separate entity.

If there is a need to acknowledge an entity in text, either “the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade” or “the Australian Government” should be used.

AusAID is not to be used in any instance as it no longer exists.

Phrases such as “an Australian aid initiative” or “an Australian aid project” should be used sparingly and only if it is made clear that the activity is by the Australian Government/DFAT. For example:

  • This program, administered by [XYZ], is an Australian aid project, funded by the Australian Government.
  • This initiative is an Australian aid project, funded by the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade.

Advertisements

Advertisements can use any of the following:

  • the Australian Aid Identifier and DFAT crest
  • the words, ‘Funded by the Australian Government’
  • the words, ‘Supported by the Australian Government’.

Stationery (including business cards)

Managing contractors, NGOs or multilaterals and their staff must not use the DFAT crest, the retired AusAID crest or the Australian Government crest on any stationery, including business cards, as this can incorrectly imply that the organisation acts with the authority of the Australian Government or that their staff are Australian Government employees.

The Australian Aid Identifier can be used on business cards, and office stationery for partners, if approved by the Publications and Branding Unit.

It is permissible for someone working for a partner organisation to use one of the following statements of acknowledgement if stationery signifies a program or project:

  • For projects where Australia is the only donor: [project or initiative name] is supported by the Australian Government; or [project or initiative name] is supported by the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade.
  • For projects where Australia is the major funder: [project or initiative name] is supported by the Australian Government, [other donor name] and [other donor name].
  • For projects partly funded by Australia and where another agency, business or government is the major funder: Supported by the Australian Government.

Banners

Pull-up banners, and other portable displays featuring the AusAID crest and old Australian Aid Identifier, can no longer be used.

Some partners may be eligible to receive replacement banners if they were originally supplied by the Australian Government. All enquiries and requests should be sent to: public.diplomacy@dfat.gov.au.

Generic Australian Government, DFAT, and artwork with the Australian Aid Identifier, will be produced and can be supplied on demand for banners.

When creating banners, partners must send the artwork to the Publications and Branding Unit before production to ensure they are brand compliant.

It is advised that partners do not produce a large amount of new banners, clothing or merchandise until a comprehensive branding suite and guidelines are developed unless completely necessary and only after discussing with the Publications and Branding Unit.

Clothing and merchandise

Clothing and merchandise featuring the AusAID crest, the old Australian Aid Identifier or the AusAID watermark can no longer be used unless an exemption is granted by the Publications and Branding Unit.

Requests for logos on clothing and other merchandise will be approved on a case-by-case basis by the Publications and Branding Unit.

Compliance

Partners must still adhere to visibility and acknowledgement clauses in contracts and agreements with the DFAT crest replacing the AusAID crest and the revised Australian Aid Identifier replacing the old identifier, in all instances, where possible.

Clearances

In the absence of comprehensive branding and visibility guidelines, all requests and enquiries should be forwarded to the Publications and Branding Unit for approval.

Frequently asked questions

Q: Do I still have to brand aid initiatives and projects?

A: Yes. Recognising the support of the Australian Government for aid and development projects continues to be a requirement.

Q: Where can I obtain copies of the revised Australian Aid Identifier and DFAT crest?

A: Copies of the Australian Aid Identifier and DFAT crest are available in a variety of formats from the DFAT website at http://dfat.gov.au/dept/logos/.

Q: Who can provide branding advice and clearances for compliance with branding guidelines?

A: All enquiries regarding branding and requests for clearances should be directed to public.diplomacy@dfat.gov.au.

Q: Should I replace all existing signs and materials with the new Australian Aid Identifier?

A: No. Existing materials featuring the previous version of the Australian Aid Identifier, or the former AusAID crest should be updated according to business needs and material life cycles. Partners are advised not to incur additional costs updating existing signage or materials at this time unless there is a business case to do so.