Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC) – Government of Australia (GoA) Partnership for Pacific Regionalism and Enhanced Development 2014-2023

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Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC) – Government of Australia (GoA) Partnership for Pacific Regionalism and Enhanced Development 2014-2023 [PDF 837 KB]

  1. PREAMBLE

    1.1 This Partnership for Development between the Government of Australia (GOA) and the Secretariat for Pacific Community (SPC) establishes our shared vision to work in close cooperation to achieve improved development outcomes and sustainable improvements in the quality of life of all Pacific islanders. Specifically, this Partnership provides for furthering opportunity and mutual accountability for adding development value for SPC island members through regional cooperation, collaboration and integration by 2023.

    1.2 The SPC Corporate Strategic Plan 2013-2015 will guide SPC’s interactions with GOA during the initial stages of this Partnership.

    1.3 The GOA Guidance Note: Pacific Regional Organisations 2013-2023 will guide GOA’s interactions with SPC and all other Pacific regional organisations during this Partnership.

  2. PRINCIPLES
  3. 2.1 The following principles will underpin all aspects of the development relationship between GOA and SPC.

    • Mutual respect, including openness to working together and exploring new opportunities together, and resolving through open discussion any tensions and challenges that emerge.
    • Mutual responsibility and accountability. Australia, Pacific island member countries and SPC are jointly responsible and accountable for the work undertaken through this partnership.
    • A focus on results and measuring impact. The impact of our joint work, ideally improved economic and social development outcomes for the region as a whole and for individual island member states, will be measured. This will include through joint, regular and evidence-based review of progress against the commitments and objectives of this Partnership.
    • Enhance donor harmonisation. The partnership approach will support donor harmonisation, to simplify procedures, reduce the reporting and administration burden, and avoid duplication. GOA and SPC will also ensure bilateral assistance is mutually enhancing and complementary wherever possible.
    • Visibility. GOA and SPC recognise the importance of appropriate visibility of the work of this partnership and will work to maximise communication and awareness.
    • Transparency about the partnership within GOA and SPC, with all SPC members, and with other external stakeholders.

    2.2 GOA acknowledges the responsibility of SPC to account for its policies, programs and resource allocation to the Conference of the Pacific Community and to the Committee of Representatives of Governments and Administrations (CRGA).

    2.3 SPC acknowledges the responsibility of GOA to account to its Parliament and people on its contributions to regional development in the Pacific, including those channelled through SPC.

  4. OBJECTIVES
  5. 3.1 Overarching goal:

    Recognising the emerging development challenges facing the Pacific region for the next ten years and beyond, this partnership will position the GOA (through its appropriate mechanisms) and the Secretariat of the Pacific Community to bring together their respective intellectual and technical capacities and resources to support Pacific island states to realise their development aspirations.

    3.2 Three year objectives:

    • Effective and efficient regional service delivery to support PICTs to achieve sustainable development outcomes in areas including fisheries, public health, forestry, agriculture, statistics, applied geoscience, transport, energy, educational assessment, human rights, and gender, characterised by:
      • Multi-sector approaches;
      • Leveraging networks and cross-sector skills; and
      • Enhancing development and aid effectiveness principles.
    • Enhanced SPC capability to support regional and island member development priorities, characterised by:
      • Development of an SPC-wide planning, monitoring, evaluation and accountability systems which enables demonstration of results to members and donors and improved development effectiveness;
      • Improved effectiveness of financial budgeting and reporting by more clearly linking resource allocations and key priorities in the Corporate Strategic Plan;
      • Enhanced effectiveness of SPC governance systems in line with recommendation of the independent external review; and
      • Consolidation of SPC’s portfolio of programmes to larger, more cohesive priority programmes.
    • To have built a combined and proactive approach to addressing major regional and global development challenges, characterised by:
      • More efficient and effective funding mechanisms with a focus on moving from transaction based funding to a proactive partnership approach;
      • Greater cooperation in planning and delivery of technical services for mutual results;
      • Transparent and streamlined communication and management arrangements; and
      • Increased cooperation and synergy at bilateral levels between the two parties and with other stakeholders.

    3.3 The parties intend that the scope of this Partnership will remain flexible over its life, able to incorporate priority outcomes that may be developed incrementally over time. These may be included in the Partnership during formal Partnership dialogue discussions each year or at other times by mutual agreement.

  6. COMMITMENTS
  7. 4.1 GOA hereby confirms its commitment to:

    • Provide SPC with effective, efficient and predictable development assistance that supports SPC to achieve its strategic objectives in line with the objectives of this partnership.
    • Support SPC to enhance its capacity, authority and legitimacy amongst members and development partners in accordance with the mandate accorded to it by its collective membership.
    • Align GOA monitoring and assessment of SPC performance as closely as possible with SPC’s own performance targets, measures and assessment systems, and support SPC to strengthen those systems as required to demonstrate results, especially in support of the Paris Declaration on Aid Effectiveness, the Accra Agenda for Action, and the Forum (Cairns) Compact on Strengthening Development Coordination in the Pacific.

    4.2 SPC hereby confirms its commitment tob>:

    • Continuously improve its governance, corporate administration and performance assessment capability to achieve the Partnership objectives, in accordance with its approved Corporate Strategic Plan 2013-15 and the agreed recommendations of its 2012 independent external review.
    • Deliver a jointly-determined program of high quality financial, technical and policy support consistent with its mandate and corporate reform objectives.
    • Advance key policy or investment actions jointly identified to implement Partnership priorities.
    • Optimise its use of Australian development assistance to achieve improved development outcomes which are consistent with the regional priorities of island members, with particular attention to the needs of small island states.

    4.3 Both parties resolve to:

    • Build on existing programs and lessons in shaping future Australian support.
    • Advance regional integration, growth and development through alignment with jointly recognised regional mechanisms supporting regional development activities such as the Pacific Plan or its successor.
    • Promote SPC regional and national level achievements to member countries and territories in bilateral dialogue.
    • Improve collective understanding of the complex political economy and other factors that influence success of regional support.
    • Balance SPC governance improvements with service delivery improvements.
    • Ensure all joint activities support gender equality and social inclusion.
    • Promote harmonisation and coordinated action with all of SPC’s development partners.
    • Promote an aligned approach with all donors including a full cost recovery approach to programme and project funding.
    • Participate, as appropriate in reviews of each other’s programs to gain a better understanding of work undertaken and lessons learned. SPC will also have representation on GOA reviews of SPC programmes.
    • Measure performance and progress of this Partnership using the Performance Assessment Framework at Schedule A.
    • Meet regularly, including on an informal basis, to share all relevant information, discuss any performance concerns as early as possible, and resolve any concerns through dialogue.
    • Report transparently to SPC members, through CRGA, on the progress of this Partnership.
  8. GOVERNANCE, MANAGEMENT AND REVIEW
  9. 5.1 High level Consultations (HLC) will take place annually between senior officials of GOA and SPC. The HLC will be hosted by Australia in Canberra and take place around March. These meetings will:

    • Focus on how both parties can utilise their convening power and technical expertise to address complex current and emerging development challenges in the region.
    • Ensure joint, regular and evidence-based review of progress and challenges in meeting the priority outcomes specified in the Partnership, including in relation to SPC efficiency and effectiveness and GOA engagement strategies.
    • Identify and build on opportunities for sharing knowledge and technical expertise to the benefit of Pacific islands’ development, including through technical and staff exchanges and enabling SPC to engage with other GOA regional programs (such as volunteers, the Pacific Leadership Program, and the Government Partnerships for Development).
    • Determine annual and multi-year GOA funding levels and their categorisation (core, programme and project funding)
    • Provide the opportunity to make any amendments to this Partnership document.
    • Regularly review the performance and ongoing value of this Partnership.

    5.2 GOA and SPC will schedule other meetings to discuss the Partnership and other issues at mutually agreed times.

    5.3 The priority outcomes, targets and indicators in Schedule A provide the basis on which Partnership progress will be monitored by both parties, and reviewed jointly at HLCs. As far as possible, these indicators align with existing indicators within SPC and GOA. Performance review by both parties will also take account of the findings of progress reports and reviews undertaken during the Partnership (at activity, sector, corporate, country or regional levels), as well as relevant independent research or other studies.

    5.4 Australia’s contribution to Partnership objectives and targets will also be assessed and reported periodically as required by the Australian aid program’s quality processes. Likewise, the alignment of Australian support for SPC with GOA policy and sectoral priorities will be reviewed periodically. Such reviews will be undertaken in cooperation and consultation with SPC.

    5.5 All HLC decisions will be recorded and the meeting records circulated to all SPC members and made available on request to other interested stakeholders.

    5.6 An independent review of the Partnership will be undertaken every three years during the partnership based on jointly agreed terms of reference. This includes a mid-term review at the beginning of 2016 and 2019 that will assess the partnership, including its indicators in the Performance Framework, analysis and commentary on key achievements, issues, challenges and lessons learned, and recommendations on how the partnership could be improved. A final year review will take place at the end of this partnership period in 2022 which will have a greater focus on the outcomes this partnership achieves as a result of SPC and GOA activities and engagement approaches. This will include consideration of relevance, effectiveness, efficiency, monitoring and evaluation, sustainability and gender equality. These reviews will be led by an independent evaluator and include a representative from SPC and GOA.

    5.7 GOA will identify a single focal point for all communications between SPC and Australian government stakeholders. This approach will not inhibit appropriate and ongoing collegial exchanges amongst staff and consultants employed by either party, or substitute for program management being undertaken at appropriate levels. It will add value to the relationship by enabling coherence and consistency. It will also provide an initial point of contact to resolve any tensions that emerge in the relationship. In SPC the focal point will be the Director of the Strategic Engagement, Policy and Planning Facility SEPPF (or their delegate), and likewise this will be to facilitate consistency rather than to limiting or “gate-keep” engagement.

    5.8 GOA will establish an information sharing group for Australian government stakeholders engaging with SPC, to discuss and reach consensus on GOA priorities and objectives in working with SPC. Their discussions will inform the formal policy dialogue at HLC meetings and help bring to light evidence of development outcomes SPC is achieving with Australian support.

    5.9 SPC will invite GOA representatives to learning and knowledge development events and to visit programmes implemented in PICTs. SPC will also engage GOA representatives in-country when a Joint Country Strategy (JCS) mission is occurring and welcome GOA engagement. GOA will also provide SPC with country strategies (where not confidential) so SPC may have a clearer understanding of Australia’s broader development investment in each country.

  10. LEVELS AND FORMS OF DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE
  11. Financing

    6.1 Through this Partnership, GOA commits to provide SPC with predictable, multi-year financing. Under the broader overarching goal, funding under this partnership will be programmed on a three-year basis. It will be affirmed on an annual basis, subject to positive partnership progress and successful appropriation of required funding in Australia’s national budget each year.

    6.2 GOA commits to allocate an increasing portion of its overall annual SPC project funding to the SPC programme and core budgets and to convert existing separate projects to programme funding where they meet the following criteria:

    • The service is in high demand from members or represents a clear regional public good;
    • There is a recognised ongoing need for assistance in the Pacific and it is unlikely to be met at the national level;
    • The work is part of SPC’s core work program (as agreed by CRGA and Conference);
    • There is a high quality, costed division strategy and work program in place, with an associated M&E framework;
    • It is consistent with GOA’s long term agenda in the Pacific; and
    • SPC is the most appropriate development partner to deliver the program.

    6.3 Where the representatives to the HLC decide that a conversion to programme funding is appropriate, implementation of this decision shall take place in a timeframe agreed by the GOA and SPC and the necessary amendment(s) shall be made to the Core Funding Grant Agreement. Member states and territories shall be informed of the funds converted from project to programme funding at the next session of CRGA.

    6.4 Where funding is converted from project to programme it will be included in SPC’s annual budget as programme funding. This means the funds will be allocated to the relevant programme for the purpose of supporting the approved division strategy/strategies and work plan(s). The expectation is full cost recovery will be applied to this funding so the full SPC costs of delivering each division’s strategy will be properly included. All narrative and financial reporting on programme funding will be provided to GOA and other members through CRGA reporting. 

    6.5 GOA will only support SPC to expand its range of bilateral or sub-regional activities where they   relate to the particular needs of smaller island states for regionally-delivered assistance.

    6.6 GOA commits further to limit separate project funding and Grant Agreements to activities that:

    • Have specific time-bound outputs and outcomes and where an ongoing work program is not planned;
    • Address an emerging priority that may or may not become a core service of SPC in the longer term; or
    • Have uncertainty in relation to ongoing availability of funding.

    6.7 GOA will provide core and programme funding to SPC through three year Grant Agreements. The agreement will be reviewed after two years to determine whether a new multi-year agreement should be negotiated in the third year of the agreement. The review will consider the performance of both GOA and SPC against the Partnership’s performance framework.

    6.8 GOA will support SPC’s efforts to review its cost recovery model to build a more sustainable financing structure, including any well-justified proposal for revision to recover the full indirect costs associated with program implementation. Such costs will need to be clearly identifiable, benchmarked where possible against other comparable effective organisations and well budgeted.

    6.9 SPC undertakes to disburse all funds provided by GOA in accordance with the principles, terms and conditions of this Partnership and to take all reasonable steps to achieve and demonstrate value for money, in accordance with sound financial and administrative practice.

    6.10 GOA will make payments to SPC in the amounts and at the times specified in any separate Grant Agreements relating to core funding or to a particular project. All Australian official development assistance will be provided to SPC under this Partnership and using the template provided at Schedule B.

    Joint approach to strengthening performance

    6.11 This Partnership offers a significant opportunity for GOA and SPC to learn together and support the development of both organisations in areas such as organisational development, technical capacity, quality and development effectiveness, performance management, and strengthening our shared understanding of Pacific regionalism.

    6.12 Rather than focusing narrowly on technical and managerial capacity as in the past, GOA will support the process already begun within SPC to strengthen the full range of capabilities needed for the organisation to function effectively, including its plans for cross-divisional work to address various development issues.

    6.13 Particular resources which can be brought to this capacity development process include the following:

    6.13.1 GOA will continue to offer access to technical assistance as well as opportunity for more consolidated research and evaluation across key regional issues.

    6.13.2 Opportunity for technical exchange and collegial engagement between the two organisations, facilitated through the GOA focal point and the corresponding staff person in SPC. This exchange is expected to go beyond areas of specific program attention and funding to include opportunities for both organisations to proactively engage around areas of shared interest and expertise.

    6.13.3 GOA to make available more targeted and coordinated opportunities for SPC to engage with other GOA programs including volunteers, the Pacific Leadership Program, the Government Partnerships for Development Program and others.      

  12. PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT AND REPORTING
  13. 7.1       SPC and GOA performance reporting needs to serve multiple purposes and be fit for each of these. Clear objectives have been established for this Partnership and assessments of progress against these will be based on indicators identified in the attached Performance Assessment Framework (Schedule A). As far as possible these indicators have been aligned with existing indicators within SPC and GOA to streamline data collection. The Performance Assessment Framework will be revised throughout the life of the Partnership to reflect improvements in SPC’s monitoring, evaluation and learning system.

    7.2 Results against these indicators need to be collated and presented for discussion and analysis at the HLCs. This will be the responsibility of both SPC and GOA. The schedule of monitoring, evaluation and reporting for this Partnership is set out in the table below.

    Overview of Monitoring, Evaluation and Reporting schedule
    Report type When For whom Purpose
    Annual progress report March (commencing 2015) SPC-GOA HLC Monitoring progress against indicators in the Performance Framework, analysis and commentary on key achievements, issues, challenges and lessons learned
    Annual report November CRGA Reporting to SPC members on how SPC is contributing to development outcomes at national and regional levels
    Independent mid-term evaluation -every 3 years Beginning of 2016 and 2019 SPC-GOA HLC Independent evaluation of progress in terms of the quality and strength of the partnership between SPC and GOA (indicators in the Performance Framework) as well as the development outcomes achieved through the partnership, including analysis and commentary on key achievements, issues, challenges and lessons learned
    Independent final evaluation at the end of this agreement 2022 SPC-GOA HLC Independent evaluation of the outcomes of this partnership, including relevance, effectiveness, efficiency, monitoring and evaluation, sustainability and gender equality, achieved due to SPC and GOA activities and engagement approaches.

    7.3    SPC and GOA share a need to demonstrate the value of regional interventions at both national and regional levels. For GOA it is important to demonstrate the links between its bilateral development programs in the Pacific and support for regional organisations such as SPC. At present SPC is achieving good results, but there is an opportunity to communicate these results to all stakeholders in more accessible and regular ways. Attention to communicating results will be given priority under this Partnership.

    7.4    GOA and SPC will pursue opportunities to learn together, particularly about key issues relating to regionalism and development effectiveness across the Pacific. This Partnership will support both parties to identify opportunities for shared evaluation and research on these issues, potentially in collaboration with other regional development partners.

    7.5     GOA funding in support of SPC’s monitoring and information was converted to core funding from 2013, and it is expected that this work will continue to be resourced. GOA may offer additional resources for performance assessment, subject to resource availability and agreement by both parties.

    7.6    GOA encourages SPC to allocate five to seven per cent of all programme and project budgets to monitoring, evaluation and learning in line with OECD Development Assistance Committee guidelines.

  14. AMENDMENTS AND DOCUMENTATION
  15. 8.1 This Partnership may be revised at any time by an amendment in writing signed by GOA and SPC.

    8.2 This Partnership complements the commitments of GOA under relevant decisions of SPC’s CRGA and Conference, in particular those that relate to the core funding of SPC.

  16. CONCLUSION
  17. 9.1 This Partnership brings together the comparative advantages of GOA as a key member and financing partner, and SPC as a Pacific-owned and managed specialist technical and scientific organisation with acknowledged expertise in advancing regional development in the Pacific. It changes the nature of the relationship between the two parties to a partnership that enables change and optimises the potential for effective regional development.

    Signed on  ......................... day of .......................... 2014

    For the Government of Australia

    Peter Grigson
    Deputy  Secretary
    Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade

    For the Secretariat of the Pacific Community

    Colin Tukuitonga
    Director-General

Schedules

  1. Performance Assessment Framework
  2. Template for Grant Agreement

Schedule A: Performance assessment framework

 

Objective

Indicator

Baseline

Cumulative Targets

End of 2014

End of 2015

End of 2016

Overarching goal: Pacific island countries and territories will be making better progress in addressing development challenges and achieving aspirations through this partnership

Under Objective 1 below

Under Objective 1 below

SPC CRGA reports and JCS reviews demonstrate increasing progress towards agreed upon national and regional development outcomes set out in SPC’s Corporate Strategic Plan and JCS.

Same as 2014 Same as 2014

Objective 1: Effective and efficient regional service delivery to support PICTs to achieve sustainable development outcomes in areas including fisheries, public health, forestry, fisheries, statistics, applied geoscience, transport, energy, educational assessment, human rights, and gender.

  • Is the available evidence sufficient to indicate that development outcomes have improved?
  • Is there a clear and logical link between the support provided through the partnership and the identified outcomes?

Land, agriculture and forestry resources

Improved food and nutritional security

Number of Pacific Island Countries and Territories (PICTs) where there is an increased number of farmers using improved germplasm

8 PICTs NA 11 PICTs TBC

Improved land, agricultural and forestry resources management and development

Number of PICTS adopting new or revised sustainable national land use and forest policies

Land: 1 (2006)Forest: 2 (2007 & 2011)

NA

Land: 2 PICTs; Forest: 4 additional PICT

TBC

Improved agriculture and forestry trade

% increase in revenue from trade among SMEs receiving SPC assistance

$FJD 1,197,099 (2009)1 & 10 Start-Ups

NA

5% increase above 2009 baseline

TBC

Energy services

Improved access to affordable and efficient energy services

Number of PICTs reducing reliance on fossil fuels for power generation

As of 2013, 1 PICT has reduced its reliance

NA

3 PICTs assisted in energy efficiency programs and adoption of alternative power sources

TBC

Transport services

Improved access to safe, affordable and efficient transport services

Number of PICTs who have initiated reform processes of maritime transport services legislation and regulations that comply with recent amendments to international maritime obligations

As of 2013, EDD has supported legislative review with 2 PICTs.

NA

5 PICTs supported with legislative review

TBC

Improved access to safe, affordable and efficient transport services

Number of PICTs who have reviewed their port operation regulations/policies to comply with regional and international standards

As of 2013, EDD has supported ports regulation reviews with 3 PICTs (Cook Is, Tuvalu, FSM)

NA

Reviews initiated with 7 PICTs

TBC

Fisheries

Coastal fisheries are better managed for economic growth, food security, and environmental conservation

Number of PICTs with sustainable fish aggregating devise programmes established to enhance food security and livelihoods

10 PICTs assisted

NA

7 PICTs have sustainable programmes with data collection

TBC

Coastal fisheries are better managed for economic growth, food security, and environmental conservation

Number of new aquaculture production systems becoming operational and enterprises established or expanded with SPC support

3 new enterprises and one cluster supported

NA

6-7 viable enterprises

TBC

Oceanic fisheries are better managed for economic growth, food security and environmental conservation

Tuna stock assessment results are accepted by the annual Scientific Committee of the Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission (WCFC) as shown in the meeting record; peer reviews of assessment quality are favourable

2009-2012: all accepted; first peer review favourable

NA

Maintain acceptance;

1-2 additional peer reviews anticipated

TBC

Health

PICTs develop public health policies, plans and regulations that respond effectively to national priorities

Number of PICTs with improved policies and legislation that addresses the socio-economic determinants of NCDs (e.g. legislation on alcohol, and imports of fatty, salty, and sugary foods; education, and exercise and healthy
living)

4–5 PICTs

NA

15 PICTs

TBC

PICTs have access to high-quality information and evidence to inform policy and the delivery of core public health functions

Improved national/regional surveillance systems for the Pacific Public Health Surveillance Network (PPHSN) target diseases, emerging infectious diseases and public health emergencies, in collaboration with PPHSN partners

Weekly syndromic
surveillance reports
with often inadequate
response

NA

Alerts timely and
adequately responded
to nationally and
regionally

TBC

PICTs develop public health policies, plans and regulations that respond effectively to national priorities

Number of PICTs fully implementing the recommended comprehensive STI control and prevention strategy for the Pacific

10 PICTs

NA

16 PICTs

TBC

PICTs have access to high-quality information and evidence to inform policy and the delivery of core public health functions

Number of PICTs with national level 1 laboratories strengthened with Laboratory Quality Management System (LQMS) to test PPHSN target diseases

18 PICTs at varying
levels of capacity

NA

18 PICTs fully functional
with LQMS and
meeting regional
and/or international
standards

TBC

Applied Geoscience

Regional mineral resources law and policy frameworks developed, improved understanding of potential resources and responsible management of exploration and extractive activities

Number of PICT’s with sound minerals policy in place and implemented to regulate best practice exploration and extractive activities

 

2 PICTs per year provided with DSM policy / legal framework documents.

NA

8 PICTs

 

 

 

TBC

Defined maritime boundaries

Maritime Boundaries defined by agreed geographical coordinates with all neighbouring PICTs

Around 50% of all boundaries now defined in the region.

NA

A further 20% of boundaries agreed.

TBC

Water & Sanitation

Increased sustainable access of Pacific communities to safe drinking water and basic sanitation

 

Number of PICTs with reductions in the proportion of people living without sustainable access to safe drinking water and basic sanitation

Data from 2012
Joint Monitoring
Programme Update
and national census

NA

18 PICTs

 

TBC

Climate Change and Disaster Risk Reduction

Strengthened capacity of Pacific Island communities to respond effectively to climate change and disasters

Number of PICTs with strengthened disaster risk management (DRM) governance arrangements

Low levels of
DRM institutional capacity in PICT National Disaster Management Offices

NA

DRM governance arrangements strengthened in 5 PICs

TBC

Improved understanding and management of environmental hazards/risks, water resources, geological resources, and fragile geological environments

Awareness activities for the Pacific Catastrophe Risk Assessment and Financing Initiative/Pacific Risk Information System risk profiles undertaken for Pacific Island Countries

Risk profiles developed in 2011 for all PICs

 

NA

Awareness activities undertaken in 7 PICS

 

TBC

Gender equality

Strengthened capability for Pacific Island communities to advance gender equality and women’s empowerment

Number of PICTs with legislation that complies with the Convention on the Elimination of all forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW)

Currently PNG, RMI, Palau, Samoa, Vanuatu, Fiji all have legislation which addresses some forms of VAW

NA

>50% compliance among PICTs

TBC

Strengthened capability for Pacific Island communities to advance gender equality and women’s empowerment

SPC demonstrates that gender is being mainstreamed across all sectors through major corporate policy documents and statements, programme and funding agreements, programme delivery and this is monitored routinely by the Gender Mainstreaming Committee using the Gender Mainstreaming commitments monitoring and evaluation mechanism.

Currently ad hoc although documents increasingly reference gender dimensions

NA

Major policy documents and statements across sectors include prominent reference to gender equality and how gender relates to that sector or area of work

TBC

Human Rights

Increase compliance with international human rights standards and obligations

Number of PICTs with increased compliance with international human rights standards through improved legislation, policies, and practices 

Human rights country status as noted in the  Universal Periodic Review country reports

NA

2 additional PICTs adopt treaties to protect civil and political rights and economic, social and cultural rights; 3 additional adopt treaties to protect people with disabilities

TBC

Development Statistics

Pacific national and regional statistics are accessible and are being utilised

Increased number of Pacific Island statistics offices adopting common regional methodologies including a core set for census questions, Pacific Household income and Expenditure Survey methodology, and statistical classifications (Pacific Classification of Individual Consumption by Purpose (PACCOICOP), to provide regionally comparable statistics which are in line with international standards

i) 2010 World  round of censuses, all PICTs used different census form

ii)Standard Pacific HIES
Methodology  developed in 2012 replacing 5 separate versions previously used

NA

i)commitment by all PICTs at 2014 census planning meeting to adopt Pacific core set of census questions

ii)Adoption of common HIES methodology by 5 PICTs

TBC

Literacy, Numeracy and Better Quality Education

Increased PICT capacity to deliver better quality education

Number of member PICTs implementing national assessment policies and standards (literacy, teacher, principal standards)  to monitor and evaluate the quality of education (PaBER)

7 PICTs countries
(PNG, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Fiji, Vanuatu, Kiribati, Tuvalu)

NA

10 PICTs implemented assessment policies and educational standards

TBC

Improved Literacy and Numeracy levels nationally and regionally

Number of PICTs utilising evidence based on research to inform and implement relevant policy intervention to improving Literacy and Numeracy levels (including PaBER)

3 PICTs
(PNG, Solomon Is, Samoa)

NA

10 PICTs  with research-based  intervention programmes

TBC

A regional system is established that facilitates international recognition of Pacific Qualifications

Maintain the currency of information on the Pacific Register of Qualifications and Standards (PRQS) database

29 qualifications and 50 registered providers in 3 PICTs (Tonga, Samoa, Fiji)

NA

2 additional PICT (PNG, Vanuatu) and
15 new qualifications uploaded and
10 newly registered providers each year

TBC

Objective 2: Enhanced SPC capability to support regional and island member development priorities

  • In what way are enhanced capabilities contributing to SPC improved performance?
  • What additional areas of SPC capability require development to support improved performance?

Development of an SPC-wide planning, monitoring, evaluation and accountability systems which enables demonstration of results to members and donors and improved development effectiveness

Improved
organisation-wide monitoring, evaluation and reporting against agreed upon national and regional development outcomes set out in SPC’s Corporate Strategic Plan and Joint Country Strategies.

Integrated Reporting Information System developed and piloted with half of SPC divisions enabling improved output reporting. Needs to be supported with a clear process for organisational-wide MEL analysis and reporting against the Corporate Strategic Plan.

Monitoring, evaluation and learning plan developed and endorsed across the organisation for analysis and reporting against the key development outcomes in the Corporate Strategic Plan.

SPC reports to CRGA 44 on its results against the Corporate Strategic Plan.

Improved annual report against Corporate Strategic Plan demonstrating SPC outcomes/impact and lessons learned.

Improved annual report against Corporate Strategic Plan demonstrating SPC outcomes/impact and lessons learned.

Number of country and/or regional sector evaluations completed and lessons learned applied for further improvement

No corporate evaluation schedule in place

Evaluation schedule finalised and two evaluations completed

4 evaluations completed

6 evaluations completed

 

Improved reporting on gender equality within SPC programmes

Few SPC reports reflect gender equality outcomes, sex disaggregated data is not included as standard

SPC reports to CRGA on progress mainstreaming gender equality across its programs

SPC reporting to CRGA includes sex disaggregated data (where applicable) for all programs

As for 2015

Improved effectiveness of financial budgeting and reporting by more clearly linking resource allocations key priorities in the Corporate Strategic Plan

NA

SPC 2014 budget report

SPC provides in year budget reporting to CRGA showing allocations against Corporate Strategic Plan priorities

Increase in resources for Corporate Strategic Plan priorities reflected in 2015 budget.

TBC

Enhanced effectiveness of SPC governance systems in line with recommendation of the independent external review

NA

Current governance arrangements

CRGA review of SPC governance arrangements completed.

Agreed governance review recommendations are implemented by SPC and members.

TBC

Consolidation of SPC’s portfolio of programmes to larger, more cohesive priority programmes

Number of focused core projects

200+ programmes

200+ programmes

50 programmes

TBC

Objective 3: To have built a combined and proactive approach to addressing major regional and global development challenges

  • What are the aspects of the combined and proactive approach to working together that are making the most contribution to enabling SPC achieve its objectives?
  • In what ways could working arrangements be further enhanced to support SPC achieve its objectives?

More efficient and effective funding mechanisms

Australian combined core and programme funding as a percentage of total Australian funding

33 per cent

51 per cent

57 per cent

TBC

Number of SPC-GOA funding agreements outside this partnership

3

2

0

0

Joint technical activity and cooperation

NA

Technical cooperation operates on ad hoc basis within sectors and without strategic oversight from senior management teams

Specific areas of technical cooperation between SPC and GOA are identified and agreed upon in the HLC (may include development of strategic plans, evaluations, joint analysis of major regional development issues, sharing technical capacity, SPC staff participating in the Australian aid program’s quality assurance processes such as peer reviews, Australian participation in relevant SPC technical meetings.

Report to HLC on the progress in each identified area of technical cooperation

Assessment by mid-term evaluation of the benefits of the technical cooperation in each areas and lessons learned for improving development effectiveness.

Transparent and streamlined communication and management arrangements

Occurrence of HLCs between SPC and GOA

No HLCs held

HLC held annually with clear agenda, SPC-GOA joint progress report submitted and outcomes documented and shared with CRGA.

Same as 2014

 

Same as 2014

 

Attendance at GOA information sharing group

No GOA information sharing group in existence.

GOA information sharing group established and meets twice. 50 per cent of Australian government partners attend.

GOA information sharing group meets three times. 70 per cent of Australian government partners attend.

GOA information sharing group meets three times. 80 per cent of Australian government partners attend.

% of funding proposals and reports submitted to GOA reviewed by SEPPF

SEPPF review proposals and reports on ad hoc basis

30 per cent

60 per cent

90 per cent

Increased cooperation and synergy at bilateral levels between the two organisations and with other actors.

 

Reflection of synergy in SPC’s Joint Country Strategies.

 

No structured linkages between GOA bilateral development assistance and SPC programs.

New joint country strategies developed in consultation with PICTs reflect increased synergy with GOA bilateral arrangements.

SPC programs reflected in GOA bilateral agreements and assessments (e.g. gender equality, statistics, health, fisheries).

Same as 2014

 

Same as 2014

 

  • 1 This is calculated on the figures provided for 12 of the 26 enterprises within IACT. No data is yet available for 4 enterprises. 10 enterprises were not functioning in 2009 so are considered start-ups and their baseline revenue is FJD$ 0.


Last Updated: 23 February 2015