NPDI Statement for 2015 NPT Review Conference

  1. On behalf of Australia, Canada, Chile, Germany, Japan, Mexico, the Netherlands, Nigeria, the Philippines, Poland, Turkey and the United Arab Emirates, member states of the Non-Proliferation and Disarmament Initiative, or NPDI, I would like to express my heartfelt congratulations to you, Ambassador Feroukhi, on your assumption of the presidency of the 2015 NPT Review Conference. I assure you of the utmost support of the NPDI for your leadership in making this conference a success.

Madam President,

  1. The NPDI was established to take forward the 2010 NPT Review Conference outcomes, in particular the 2010 Action Plan, and to advance the nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation agendas as mutually reinforcing processes. Its membership is cross-regional, bringing together non-nuclear-weapon states from diverse backgrounds.
  2. This diversity is our strength. It allows us to play a constructive and proactive role in bridging positions to help craft a successful outcome at this RevCon. What we have in common is a strong commitment to the NPT as the cornerstone of the global nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation regime and as the basis for the development of the peaceful uses of nuclear technology. We stress the importance of universal adherence to the Treaty.

Madam President,

  1. This year’s NPT RevCon marks 70 years since the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. We are deeply concerned at the catastrophic humanitarian consequences of any use of nuclear weapons, as expressed in the 2010 Final Document and as discussed in several conferences that have taken place since 2010. This concern fundamentally underpins all our work for nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation in pursuit of a world free of nuclear weapons. Last April in Hiroshima, NPDI Foreign Ministers witnessed first-hand the catastrophic humanitarian consequences of an atomic bombing that last even today. They heard deeply touching testimonies of atomic bomb survivors Hibakushas ( pronounced: He-buck-shers) which were a vivid reminder of what is at stake. We invite the world’s political leaders to visit Hiroshima and Nagasaki to witness firsthand the consequences.
  2. We reaffirm the positions we expressed in our Hiroshima ministerial statement in April 2014, including our intention to actively contribute to a successful outcome at the 2015 NPT RevCon.
  3. In addition to our 17 working papers so far, the NPDI is pleased to submit for consideration at this RevCon, first, a working paper on transparency by non-nuclear-weapon states and, second, a working paper with a comprehensive list of practical recommendations for a RevCon outcomes document that addresses all three pillars of the NPT. These recommendations are intended to be a ‘menu’ of possible elements that we hope can assist this conference to arrive at an action-oriented outcomes document that builds upon the 2010 Action Plan. As our diverse, cross-regional membership was able to reach consensus on this text, we hope this language will be acceptable to all states at the RevCon.
  4. On disarmament, we welcome steps taken so far by the nuclear-weapon states, including by the Russian Federation and the United States under the New START Treaty, which is being implemented in spite of the current difficult political climate. But there are still more than 16,000 nuclear warheads in existence today, many on high alert.
  5. With a view to achieving the unequivocal undertaking by all nuclear-weapon states to eliminate their nuclear arsenals in accordance with article VI, we call for greater progress in meeting disarmament commitments. This includes enhanced transparency, a diminished role for nuclear weapons in military and security doctrines, deeper reductions in all types of nuclear weapons and multilateral negotiations for the reduction of nuclear weapons. We call on all States that have not done so, to sign and ratify the CTBT. We also welcome the work of the Fissile Material Cut-Off Treaty Group of Government Experts, which recently adopted a robust consensus report reflecting the most in-depth discussions on the topic to date.
  6. On non-proliferation, we need to strengthen the authority of the IAEA to verify both the correctness and the completeness of State reports. Nuclear suppliers should meet strict guidelines before entering into new supply arrangements with non-nuclear-weapon-states.
  7. On peaceful uses, we underline the importance of increased accessibility and broader application of nuclear science and technology. We emphasise the central role of the IAEA in the peaceful uses of nuclear energy and in verification. States must also commit to the ongoing implementation of safeguards as well as appropriate and effective levels of safety and security.

Madam President,

  1. The NPDI strongly condemns North Korea’s continued development of its nuclear and ballistic missile programs. These undermine the NPT and the global non-proliferation regime and pose a great threat to regional and global peace and stability. We strongly urge North Korea to take concrete steps to honour its commitments under the 2005 Six-Party Talks Joint Statement and to fully comply with its obligations under all the relevant UN Security Council resolutions, to immediately cease all related activities in Yongbyong, to abandon all nuclear weapons and existing nuclear programs, and to return to compliance with its IAEA safeguards agreement and the NPT.
  2. We are encouraged by the understanding reached between Iran and the E3 plus 3 about key parameters for a Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action for Iran’s nuclear program. This is an important step. We hope the negotiations will lead to the final and comprehensive resolution of all the international community’s concerns regarding Iran’s nuclear program.
  3. We encourage all stakeholders, including countries of the Middle East region, the Convenors and Facilitator, to continue to work constructively to reach agreement on the arrangements for a Conference on a WMD-Free Zone in the Middle East to take place at the earliest opportunity.

Madam President,

  1. Our group understands that, instead of focusing on differences, we are most effective when we focus on areas of commonality in promoting practical actions to achieve outcomes that are in everyone’s interests.
  2. This is a time for looking back at the last five years, fairly and honestly – to assess what we have achieved and where we have more work to do. But we also need to look forward and agree on what steps to take next. It is the responsibility of all States parties to fulfil their commitments and obligations under the Treaty and to work to uphold and strengthen that regime. The NPDI is ready to work with you and all delegations to make this a successful Review Conference. We call on all States Parties to join us in reaching this goal.

Thank you.


Last Updated: 30 June 2015