Sanctions

Cote d’Ivoire sanctions changes

The Australian Government is implementing changes to Australia’s sanctions on Cote d’Ivoire in line with our international obligations under UN Security Council Resolution 2283 (2016).
As of 28 April 2016, all sanctions related to Cote d’Ivoire ceased with immediate effect, in accordance with Section 8 of the Charter of the United Nations Act 1945.

Accordingly, there is no longer any sanction related restrictions on the export or supply of ‘arms are related lethal material’ to Côte d’Ivoire.  Further, the targeted financial sanctions and travel bans on individuals and entities designated by the United Nations Security Council under this sanctions regime no longer apply. The Consolidated List of all persons and entities who are subject to targeted financial sanctions or travel bans under Australian sanctions laws has accordingly been updated. 

The Australian Government will implement the changes to UNSC sanctions on on Cote d’Ivoire as required by UN Security Council Resolution 2283 (2016), by repealing Charter of the United Nations (Sanctions – Côte d'Ivoire) Regulations 2008 and Regulation 13CN of the Customs (Prohibited Exports) Regulations 1958, as soon as practicable.

Iran sanctions changes

The Australian Government is implementing changes to Australia’s sanctions on Iran in line with our international obligations under UN Security Council resolutions.

The Australian Government will apply the changes to UN sanctions on Iran as required by UN Security Council Resolution 2231.

The Australian Government has repealed certain autonomous sanctions on Iran, while others will remain in place.

The Iran sanctions website will be amended to reflect the changes to Australian sanction laws as they take legislative effect.

Australia and sanctions

Sanctions are measures not involving the use of armed force that are imposed in situations of international concern, including the grave repression of human rights, the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction or their means of delivery, or armed conflict.

They impose restrictions on activities that relate to particular countries, goods and services, or persons and entities.

Australian sanction laws implement United Nations Security Council (UNSC) sanctions regimes and Australian autonomous sanctions regimes.

Contravening an Australian sanction law may be a serious criminal offence. Penalties for sanctions offences include up to ten years in prison and substantial fines.

You should consider seeking legal advice in relation to an activity that may contravene an Australian sanction law.

The Minister for Foreign Affairs or the Minister's delegate may be able to grant a permit authorising an activity that would otherwise contravene an Australian sanction law.

You can contact us in relation to sanctions permits by registering as a user of the Online Sanctions Administration System (OSAS).

Contacting us is no substitute for seeking legal advice. We can provide information on Australian sanction laws, but can only provide legal advice to the Australian Government.

We are committed to administering Australian sanction laws diligently, but also in a way that facilitates trade wherever possible.

Please carefully consider the information in this section before contacting us. You can find detailed information by following the links in the menu.




Last Updated: 14 April 2016