Myanmar

Australia imposes an autonomous sanctions regime in relation to Myanmar.

The Australian Government first imposed the autonomous sanctions regime in 1991 in response to the Myanmar Government’s failure to recognise the victory of the National League for Democracy in the elections in Myanmar in 1990. The autonomous sanctions regime initially imposed an arms embargo, targeted financial sanctions and travel bans.

In response to democratic reforms initiated by the government of President Thein Sein, the Australian Government lifted the targeted financial sanctions and travel bans in July 2012. The Minister for Foreign Affairs retains the capacity to re-impose targeted travel and financial sanctions in relation to Myanmar.

Australia maintains some sanction measures in relation to Myanmar, including an arms embargo, due to concerns about ongoing armed conflict, weapons proliferation and human rights. Australians doing business in Myanmar should be aware that individuals and companies with close ties to the Myanmar Government military continue to exercise influence across many sectors of the economy, including, but not limited to the oil, gas and timber sectors.

This page summarises the current sanctions measures imposed by the autonomous sanctions regime in relation to Myanmar.

This page also includes useful links.

Restrictions on the export or supply of goods

Australian law prohibits the direct or indirect supply, sale or transfer to Myanmar, for use in Myanmar, or for the benefit of Myanmar, of the following ‘export sanctioned goods':

without a sanctions permit.

Conditions for the grant of a sanctions permit

The Minister for Foreign Affairs may grant a sanctions permit authorising an activity that would otherwise contravene this prohibition if the Minister is satisfied that it would be in the national interest to do so.

If you assess that your activity satisfies this condition, you may apply for a sanctions permit using the Online Sanctions Administration System (OSAS).

Implementing legislation

Restrictions on the export or provision of services

  1. Australian law prohibits the provision to any person of:
    • technical advice, assistance or training; or
    • financial assistance; or
    • a financial service; or
    • another service;

    if it assists with, or is provided in relation to:

    • the direct or indirect supply, sale or transfer of arms or related matériel to Myanmar, for use in Myanmar, or for the benefit of Myanmar

    without a sanctions permit.

  2. Australian law also prohibits the provision to Myanmar, or to a person for use in Myanmar, of:
    • technical advice, assistance or training; or
    • financial assistance; or
    • a financial service; or
    • another service;

    if it assists with, or is provided in relation to:

    • the manufacture, maintenance or use of arms or related matériel

    without a sanctions permit.

Conditions for the grant of a sanctions permit

The Minister for Foreign Affairs may grant a sanctions permit authorising an activity that would otherwise contravene these prohibitions if the Minister is satisfied that it would be in the national interest to do so.

If you assess that your activity satisfies this condition, you may apply for a sanctions permit using the Online Sanctions Administration System (OSAS).

Implementing legislation

Last Updated: 25 June 2014