International anti-corruption efforts

Global corruption is far-reaching and deeply damaging. It undermines efforts against poverty and disease and facilitates serious transnational crimes. Corruption also harms investment and economic growth.

Australia is a party to a number of international instruments aimed at combating corruption:

  • the United Nations Convention against Corruption (UNCAC);
  • the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organised Crime (UNTOC);
  • the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Convention on Combating Bribery of Foreign Public Officials in International Business Transactions (the Anti-Bribery Convention).

Australia's obligations under the UNCAC and the Anti-Bribery Convention include making foreign bribery an offence and prosecuting the individuals and companies who engage in it.

Australian participation

Review of Australia's implementation of the United Nations Convention against Corruption (UNCAC) commenced in 2011, through self-assessment and peer assessment processes, and will continue into the first half of 2012. The UNCAC Implementation Review Mechanism requires States Parties to undergo review on their compliance with the Convention every five years.

The OECD will also review Australia's practices in 2012, in accordance with our implementation of the OECD Convention on Combating Bribery of Foreign Public Officials in International Business Transactions.

More information

The Attorney-Generals' Department leads Australia's engagement in the UNCAC review process.

The Attorney-General's Department leads Australia's engagement in the OECD Working Group on Bribery in International Business Transactions.

Further information and guidance for Australian individual and companies in relation to the OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises can be found at the ANCP website.