Media release from the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade

February 2003

Seasons of the Kunwinjku
Aboriginal art from West Arnhem Land

DFAT's International touring Indigenous Art Exhibition

Australia's Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade is proud to present the art exhibition Seasons of the Kunwinjku by artists from the Kunwinjku clans of West Arnhem Land, Northern Territory.

This collection of contemporary Indigenous Australian art reflects the stylistic techniques that have been employed by the Kunwinku people for over 50,000 years.

The collection of 13 paintings and 13 photographs tells the traditional stories of the Kunwinjku clans' ancestors. While many stories relate to the Dreamtime, the time of creation, the exhibition also provides an insight into Indigenous culture and the collective knowledge about the seasonal cycles of West Arnhem Land.

The exhibition was purchased by the Department in 1994 from the Hogarth Galleries Aboriginal Art Centre, Sydney, and continues to enjoy a successful international touring program. To date, the exhibition has travelled to many cities around the world including Bangkok, Shanghai, Singapore, Tokyo, Seoul, Dhaka, Karachi, Mexico City, Manila, Buenos Aires, Caracas, Maracaibo, Bogota, Wellington, Harare, Nairobi, Port Louis, Pretoria, Lagos, Rome, Ottowa and Port Moresby.

In 2002, the exhibition travelled to Sao Paulo (Brazil), Hanoi (Vietnam), Vientiane (Laos), Kathmandu (Nepal) and Rangoon (Burma). The exhibition will be in Indonesia until the end of June 2003.

The exhibition is managed and owned by the Department's Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Program, Images of Australia Branch and the tour is being supported by Australia's diplomatic missions abroad.

Media Inquires:

Tracey Haines, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Program, Images of Australia Branch (Tel: 02-6261 3942)
Anthony Murphy, Manager, Injalak Arts and Crafts, Northern Territory (Tel: 08-8979 0190)
Djon Mundine, Indigenous art specialist, based in Canberra (Mobile: 0415 522 020)