Music students go global

15 August 2017

The Queensland University of Technology (QUT) and Chennai’s KM Music Conservatory gave students the commercial skills to prosper in a rapidly changing industry. Last November, they presented Indie100 at IndiEarth Xchange, a program designed to offer emerging independent musicians the opportunity to be mentored, recorded, mixed and mastered by top Australian and Indian producers.

Learning an instrument these days isn’t enough to prepare music students for successful careers in the music industry.  Becoming a professional musician also requires global thinking and connectivity.  Indian and Australian educational models lack industry engagement and entrepreneurship, leaving students ill-equipped for future careers.

A.R. Rhaman’s KM Music Conservatory and the Queensland University of Technology (QUT) are bridging this gap by working collaboratively to internationalise and entrepreneurialise music education.

Last November, they presented Indie100 at IndiEarth Xchange, a program designed to offer emerging independent musicians the opportunity to be mentored, recorded, mixed and mastered by top Australian and Indian producers.  Twelve bands were recorded and produced during the conference. 

QUT and KM students are working online to launch, promote, and distribute the recordings locally and internationally via their project partners’ extensive networks.

The traditions of music education in India and Australia are quite different.  The West has an ostensibly ‘scientific’ approach to education whereas India is more oral and far less standardised and homogenised. ‘Both approaches have their advantages and flaws,’ says QUT Music Lecturer, Dr Kristina Kelman.  

KM staff and students will travel to Brisbane this September to evaluate the program and participate in BIGSOUND and QUT's song hub. They also plan on establishing a parallel program exchange program.

This project was supported by the Australia-India Council (AIC). The AIC advances Australia's interests by supporting activities that enhance awareness and understanding between the peoples and institutions of Australia and India.



Last Updated: 14 August 2017
People sitting and chatting around a coffee table
KM and QUT staff and students join a panel discussion at IndiEarth Xchange and share ideas and thoughts on the future of music industry education. Credit: Nicholas Kiran, KM Music Conservatory.
Photo of students in a classroom setting
Students and staff from KM and QUT with participating musicians at the very first meeting at the Indie100 event in Chennai. Credit: Nicholas Kiran, KM Music Conservatory.