92 Minute From McIntyre to Watt

Minute, Canberra, 8 June 1951

Proposed Security Arrangement with the United States and New Zealand Marjoribanks called on me this morning and asked me what progress had been made towards the conclusion of the proposed arrangement. He asked in particular whether any changes in the draft had been discussed between us and the United States, and indicated that the United Kingdom Government would hope to be informed of, and given the opportunity of commenting on, any changes that might be under consideration.

Faced with the strong probability that the United Kingdom authorities have discussed the matter with Mr. Dulles and been given his views as communicated to Mr. Spender, as a consequence of which a refusal to say anything might be interpreted as undue lack of frankness, I decided I had best say something. I made it clear to Marjoribanks that no changes of substance were contemplated. I told him in general terms, however, that the United States had suggested some modification of the articles relating to the subsidiary machinery of the proposed Council and to consultation with other states and organisations, not with the object of excluding these entirely, but in order to make the articles permissive rather than mandatory. I gave him no reason to think we were accepting these modifications, but let him infer that the United Kingdom would be kept informed, without indicating at what stage.

Marjoribanks asked whether anything had been decided about the date of signature. I said that there was no firm decision, but that we had been proceeding on the assumption that it would take place somewhere about the date of the conclusion of the Japanese peace treaty.

[NAA : A1838, 532/11, ii]