Sanctions

Lebanon

Australia fully implements the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) sanctions regime in relation to Lebanon. 

The UNSC adopted resolution 1636 (2005) on 31 October 2005 imposing the sanctions regime in response to the terrorist bombing in Beirut on 14 February 2005 that killed former Lebanese Prime Minister Rafiq Hariri and 22 others.  The sanctions regime initially imposed targeted financial transactions and travel bans.  The UNSC adopted resolution 1701 (2006) on 11 August 2006 imposing additional sanctions measures in response to the conflict between Israel and Hezbollah in July 2006.

This page summarises the current sanctions measures imposed by the UNSC and implemented by Australia in relation to Lebanon.

This page also includes useful links.

Restrictions on the export or supply of goods

Australian law prohibits the direct or indirect supply, sale or transfer to Lebanon of the following ‘export sanctioned goods’:

without a sanctions permit.

Conditions for the grant of a sanctions permit

The Minister for Foreign Affairs may grant a sanctions permit authorising an activity that would otherwise contravene this prohibition if the activity is authorised by the Government of Lebanon, or the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL).

If you assess that your activity satisfies these conditions, you may apply for a sanctions permit using the Online Sanctions Administration System (OSAS).

Implementing legislation

Restrictions on the export or provision of services

Australian law prohibits the provision to any person or entity in Lebanon of:

  • technical training or assistance

related to:

without a sanctions permit.

Conditions for the grant of a sanctions permit

The Minister for Foreign Affairs may grant a sanctions permit authorising an activity that would otherwise contravene this prohibition if it is authorised by the Government of Lebanon, or the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL).

If you assess that your activity satisfies these conditions, you may apply for a sanctions permit using the Online Sanctions Administration System (OSAS).

Implementing legislation

Targeted financial sanctions

Australian law prohibits:

  • the use of or dealing with an asset that is owned or controlled by a ‘designated person’ for Lebanon; and
  • making an asset available directly or indirectly to, or for the benefit of, a ‘designated person’ for Lebanon, a person or entity acting on behalf of or at the direction of a ‘designated person’ for Lebanon, or an entity owned or controlled by a ‘designated person’ for Lebanon

without a sanctions permit.

An ‘asset’ is defined broadly to include an asset or property of any kind, whether tangible or intangible, movable or immovable.

No person is currently designated for Lebanon by the UNSC or the UNSC Lebanon Sanctions Committee.

Implementing legislation

Travel bans

Australian law prohibits the entry into or transit through Australia of a ‘designated person’ for Lebanon without authorisation by the UNSC.

No person is currently designated by the UNSC or the UNSC Lebanon Sanctions Committee.

Implementing legislation