South Sudan

Australia fully implements the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) sanctions regime in relation to South Sudan.

On 3 March 2015, the UNSC adopted resolution 2206 (2015) imposing a sanctions regime in response to the deterioration of the security and humanitarian situation in South Sudan, which has resulted in great human suffering, including significant loss of life, large-scale displacement of people, ongoing human rights violations and abuses, and violations of international humanitarian law.  On 13 July 2018, the UNSC adopted resolution 2428 (2018) in the context of continued hostilities and violations of the Agreement on the Resolution of the Conflict of the Republic of South Sudan (ARCSS), the Agreement on the Cessation of Hostilities, Protection of Civilians and Humanitarian Access (ACOH) and the Khartoum Declaration.  It requires all Member States to implement an arms embargo in relation to South Sudan. 

This page summarises the sanctions measures imposed by the UNSC and implemented by Australia in relation to South Sudan.

This page also includes information on de-listing requests from a designated person or entity and useful links.

Restrictions on the export or supply of goods

Australian law prohibits the direct or indirect supply, sale or transfer to South Sudan of 'arms or related matériel' (sanctioned supply), without a sanctions permit.

Conditions for the grant of a sanctions permit

The Minister for Foreign Affairs may grant a sanctions permit authorising the supply of 'arms or related matériel' if:

  • a sanctioned supply is intended solely for the support of, or use by, a member of the personnel of the United Nations, including:
    • a member of the personnel of the United Nations Mission in the Republic of South Sudan; and
    • a member of the personnel of the United Nations Interim Security Force for Abyei;
  • a sanctioned supply of non-lethal military equipment that:
    • is intended solely for humanitarian or protective use; and
    • has been notified in advance to the Committee;
  • a sanctioned supply of protective clothing that is to be temporarily exported to South Sudan by any of the following, for their personal use only:
    • a member of the personnel of the United Nations;
    • a representative of the media;
    • a humanitarian or development worker;
    • a person associated with a person mentioned in any of subparagraphs (above);
  • a sanctioned supply of arms or related matériel that:
    • is to be temporarily exported to South Sudan by the forces of a State which is taking action, in accordance with international law, solely and directly to facilitate the protection or evacuation of its nationals and those for whom it has consular responsibility in South Sudan; and
    • has been notified to the Committee;
  • a sanctioned supply of arms or related matériel that:
    • is to be made to or in support of the African Union Regional Task Force; and
    • is intended solely for regional operations to counter the Lord's Resistance Army; and
    • has been notified in advance to the Committee;
  • a sanctioned supply of arms or related matériel that:
    • is to be made solely in support of the implementation of the terms of the peace agreement (within the meaning of Resolution 2428); and
    • has been approved in advance by the Committee;
  • another sanctioned supply that is a sale or supply of arms or related matériel that has been approved in advance by the Committee.

If you assess that your activity satisfies these conditions, you may apply for a sanctions permit using the Online Sanctions Administration System (OSAS).

The Minister may need to receive the approval of the UNSC South Sudan Sanctions Committee before granting a sanctions permit.

Implementing legislation

Restrictions on the export or provision of services

Australian law prohibits the provision to South Sudan of the following (sanctioned service), without a permit:

  • technical assistance, training, financial or other assistance, related to:
  • includes the provision to South Sudan of armed mercenary personnel whether or not originating in Australia.

Conditions for the grant of a sanctions permit

The Minister for Foreign Affairs may grant a sanctions permit authorising the provision of a sanctioned service in relation to one of the following:

  • training or assistance that is intended solely for the support of, or use by, a member of the personnel of the United Nations, including:
    • member of the personnel of the United Nations Mission in the Republic of South Sudan; and
    • a member of the personnel of the United Nations Interim Security Force for Abyei;
  • technical assistance or training that:
    • is related to a supply of non-lethal military equipment intended solely for humanitarian or protective use; and
    • has been notified in advance to the Committee;
  • technical training or assistance that:
    • is to be provided to or in support of the African Union Regional Task Force; and
    • is intended solely for regional operations to counter the Lord's Resistance Army; and
    • has been notified in advance to the Committee;
  • technical training or assistance that:
    • is to be provided solely in support of the implementation of the terms of the peace agreement (within the meaning of Resolution 2428); and
    • has been approved in advance by the Committee;
  • the provision of other assistance or personnel that has been approved in advance by the Committee.

If you assess that your activity satisfies these conditions, you may apply for a sanctions permit using the Online Sanctions Administration System (OSAS).

Implementing legislation

Targeted financial sanctions

Australian law prohibits:

  • the use of or dealing with an asset that is owned or controlled by a 'designated person or entity' for South Sudan; and
  • making an asset available, directly or indirectly, to or for the benefit of
    • a 'designated person or entity' for South Sudan; or
    • a person or entity acting on behalf of or at the direction of a 'designated person or entity' for South Sudan; or
    • or an entity owned or controlled by a 'designated person or entity' for South Sudan,

without a sanctions permit.

An 'asset' is defined broadly to include an asset or property of any kind, whether tangible or intangible, movable or immovable.

The Consolidated List includes the names of all designated persons and entities.

Conditions for the grant of a sanctions permit

The Minister for Foreign Affairs may grant a sanctions permit authorising an activity that would contravene these prohibitions if the activity is:

  • a 'basic expense dealing'
  • a 'legally required dealing'
  • a 'contractual dealing'
  • a 'required payment dealing'
  • or an 'extraordinary expense dealing'

as those terms are defined in regulation 5 of the Charter of the United Nations (Dealing with Assets) Regulations 2008.

If you assess that your activity satisfies these conditions, you may apply for a sanctions permit using the Online Sanctions Administration System (OSAS).

The Minister may need to notify or receive the approval of the UNSC South Sudan Sanctions Committee before granting a sanctions permit.

Implementing legislation

Travel bans

Australian law prohibits the entry into or transit through Australia of a 'designated person' for South Sudan without authorisation by the UNSC.

The Consolidated List includes the names of all designated persons.

Implementing legislation

De-listing requests from a designated person or entity

A person or entity designated for the purposes of the UNSC sanctions regime in relation to South Sudan may submit a de-listing request either through the Focal Point for De-Listing established by UNSC resolution 1730 (2006), or through the person or entity's country of citizenship or residence.

Useful links


Last Updated: 15 February 2019