Body temperature regulation in tunas: Implications for aquaculture and conservation

1 September 2016

Sector: Economics and Trade

Country location: Japan

Grantee: The Flinders University of South Australia

Tuna fish
A small, 20 cm, Pacific bluefin tuna tagged by researchers from the National Research Institute of Far Seas Fisheries of Japan near Nakatosa (Kochi Prefecture, Japan) in August 2016 (Credit: Ethan Estess, Research Technician, Monterey Bay Aquarium, California)

Project Description

In Japan, Pacific bluefin tuna is in high demand for the preparation of sashimi. Unfortunately, this has led to its over-fishing and listing as "Vulnerable" on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Technology is available for breeding bluefin tunas in captivity but success rates are low. This project aims to improve these success rates by better understanding tuna physiology.

Key dates

Seminar presentation given by A/Prof Kathryn Schuller, Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute, University of Tokyo (Kashiwanoha Campus), Kashiwa, Chiba, JAPAN, 27 July 2016

Journal article publication, High impact factor scientific journal to be decided, 03 July 2017

Visiting professor's report, Centre for International Collaboration Newsletter, Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute, University of Tokyo (Kashiwanoha Campus), Kashiwa, Chiba, JAPAN, 20 September 2016

Social media: http://www.flinders.edu.au/

Australia-Japan Foundation grant offer: $9,546.00 with GST in addition

Total project value: $9,546.00


Last Updated: 16 August 2016