Bangarra performs in Japan as a highlight of ‘Australia now’

Project Summary

28 August 2018

Sector: Arts and Culture

Country location: Japan

Grantee: Bangarra Dance Theatre


Project description

Bangarra Dance Theatre is Australia’s leading Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Dance Company, acclaimed worldwide for its moving performances, distinctive voice and authentic storytelling. With contemporary movement forged from 40,000 years of culture, Bangarra is an unforgettable dance experience.

In the company’s fourth visit to Japan, they will present 'I.B.I.S.' and 'Spirit 2018', showcasing the best of Bangarra’s 30-year repertoire in a powerful celebration of culture.

'I.B.I.S.' is a story from Murray Island in the Torres Strait, a beautiful and isolated land of laughter and sunny smiles. This joyful work explores life on the islands: a place where, despite challenges of displacement and climate change, the culture remains strong and the people optimistic.

'Spirit 2018' takes audiences into a mysterious and secret space to witness nature’s sacred poetry. This powerful collection of dance stories by Artistic Director Stephen Page celebrates the spirit of the dingo, the ephemeral life of the moth, and Indigenous people’s unbroken connection to the land.

Key dates:

  • Masterclass 1, Shobi University, 05/11/2018
  • Australian Embassy VIP Reception: dinner and Q&A with Bangarra artists, Tokyo, 06/11/2018
  • Community Workshop, Ochanomizu High School, 07/11/2018
  • Masterclass 2, Ochanomizu University, 07/11/2018
  • Performance 1: 'I.B.I.S.' Saitama Arts Theatre, 09/11/2018
  • Performance 2: 'Spirit 2018' Saitama Arts Theatre, 10/11/2018

Social media: Social media accounts as above. Handles: Instagram @bangarradancetheatre, Twitter @BangarraDance. Hashtags: #bangarra #bangarraontour YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/bangarradancetheatre

Australia-Japan Foundation grant offer: $40,000



Last Updated: 16 August 2018
dancer performing on stage
Tara Gower in Bangarra Dance Theatre’s Spirit 2018. Credit: Edward Mulvihill