Towards More Effective Renewable Energy Transitions in Korea

Project summary

30 August 2016

Sector: Science, Technology and Innovation
Country location: Australia, Republic of Korea
Grantee: Griffith University

Project Description

This project investigates the important policy problem of how to reduce local social conflict around wind-farm development in Korea to produce more effective wind energy transitions, and to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. In regard to wind farm siting typically in close proximity to local communities, the international experience is that these communities face a range of adverse impacts and issues that characterise wind farm development. They include inappropriate location with health (noise), visual, and property devaluation impacts resulting, and inadequate community engagement to better mitigate them. The project focus is on how to enhance local community engagement for: (i) local community perspectives on wind farm siting issues as valuable inputs into siting decision-making; (ii) enhanced developer and planning understandings of local impacts and issues; and subsequently, (iii) better planning and local support for wind energy. Jeju province is the key case study of wind energy development in Korea but other sites will also be explored. The findings — drawn from policy analysis, interviews with local and national stakeholders, policy seminars, and comparative studies internationally – thus aim to enhance the capacity of government, wind developers, and local communities to create more effective renewable energy transitions, and to better adapt to climate change.

Key dates:

  • Policy Seminar 1, Jeju, 20 February 2019
  • Policy Seminar 2, Seoul, 22 February 2019

Social media: Facebook, Twitter, Australian Policy Online, Research Gate, Academia Education Weekly Digest, LinkedIn, and other relevant online platforms and networks.

Australia-Korea Foundation grant offer: $36,326.40

Total project value: $36,326.40


Last Updated: 15 August 2016
Jeju wind farm

Jeju wind farm overlooking a beach community, 15 July 2016 (Credit: Richard Hindmarsh)